Peace Colloquium in the News

July 9, 2007

The Union Leader has published two articles about the college’s Colloquium on Peace, Reconciliation, Social Justice, and Global Citizenship. The colloquium, which runs July 1-13, is a two-week, intensive, interdisciplinary, residential program in peace-making, non-violence, and global citizenship, rooted in the teachings of social justice. The colloquium is being held at Saint Anselm College with students participating from both Saint Anselm College and St. Mary’s University College in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

In a June 30 article titled, “Give Peace a Chance,” the Union Leader reported:

“As Catholic colleges, both St. Mary’s and Saint Anselm, have a particular interest in promoting peace, nonviolence, reconciliation, and greater awareness of social justice,” said [Saint Anselm Professor Elaine Rizzo].

At the colloquium, students will meet with a survivor of the Rwandan genocide, learn more about Muslim perspectives on pacifism from an imam, and hear about the Irish peace process from some of the people who made it happen.

Outside of the classroom, they are planning to tour the New Hampshire Supreme Court, the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard, and attend a town meeting in Goffstown.

The four-part program begins with a unit on diversity, multiculturalism, and democracy. Saint Anselm Professor Dale Kuehne will kick it off with a lecture on “Racism: America’s Original Sin: Why Can’t We All Get Along?” In successive units, students will be immersed in the theologies and philosophies of violence and nonviolence, global citizenship, women as peacemakers, and strategies and techniques for conflict resolution.

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Watch the CNN Debates on the Web

June 18, 2007

CNN Debates Moderator Wolf BlitzerDid you miss the original TV broadcasts of the CNN Democratic and Republican debates on June 3 and 5? CNN has made the debate coverage available to the public without restrictions - a first from a major news network.

Saint Anselm College has posted the video from the debates online for public viewing at http://saintanselm.blip.tv or you can watch the debates in the video player at the bottom of this post. Because of large file sizes, each debate is divided into four parts (Parts 1-4).

Debate Footage on CNN.com
You may also watch the debates on the CNN Web site through their video stream feed or download the debates for playback on your computer or video iPod.

  • CNN Republican Debate Video - June 5, 2007
  • CNN Democratic Debate Video - June 3, 2007

Saint Anselm Debate Footage

Player Directions: To skip ahead in the above player, just click the forward button. To go back, click the back button. The video starts with the democratic debates on June 3. Click the forward button four times to listen to the CNN Republican debate.

Students Interviewed by NYC’s Fox Affiliate About Presidential Race

June 13, 2007

Students Fox InterviewDuring the June 5 Republican debate, five Saint Anselm College students were interviewed in the spin room by Dick Brennan of New York City’s Fox 5 affiliate. The students (in order of appearance in the TV interview) included, Greg Wallace ‘10, Sara Kallock ‘09, Robyn Dangora ‘10, Mark Grasso ‘10, and Jen Taylor ‘10.

You can view the interview on the Fox 5 Web site at http://www.myfoxny.com. A short commercial precedes the interview.

Political Junkies: Students See What Goes on Behind the Scenes of the Debate
Elissa Rauth ‘08 and M.E. Reidy ‘07 were interviewed on June 5 by the Union Leader about their work as runners for CNN. In the article, they talk about some of the many important jobs they had during the debates from working the candidate green rooms to standing in on the CNN set for lighting, sound, and camera checks.

You can read the article at http://www.unionleader.com.

President Clinton Challenges Young People to Address Inequality

June 12, 2007

President Bill ClintonIn a speech at Saint Anselm College on Monday evening, Former President Bill Clinton urged young people to address inequality by volunteering in their communities and embracing what they share in common. He spoke to more than 1,000 full-time volunteers assembled at the college for City Year’s week-long annual convention, Cyzygy 2007.

Clinton said politics needs to catch up so it can address a world that’s unequal, unstable, and unsustainable. The former president contributed some of the root causes of global inequality on stagnating wages and limited access to healthcare and instability on terrorism and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. He added that the world is also on an unsustainable path with rising global temperatures and a decline in the availability of oil within the next 100 years.

On conflicts across the globe, including the genocide in Rwanda, war in Sri Lanka, and conflicts in the Middle East, Clinton stated, “the people participating in these conflicts… have decided that their differences are more important than their common humanity.” Focusing on those differences, he said, is why disagreements about oil resources or religious beliefs boil over into armed, sometimes even genocidal conflict.

Clinton spoke in Sullivan Arena, which the previous week played host to both Republican and Democratic presidential hopefuls for the CNN Debates, including his wife, N.Y. Senator Hillary Clinton. A fact Clinton acknowledge in his opening remarks.

“I got a big kick out of seeing Saint Anselm splattered all over the world last week. We had the Democratic Debate here and the Republican Debate here. Now we have a guy speaking that can’t run for president anymore.”

To hear a podcast of President Bill Clinton’s speech, click on the audio file included with this post.

 
 sacp11: Play Now | Play in Popup | Download

BBC News Interviews Prof. Dean Spiliotes and Matt St. John ‘09

June 11, 2007

IMG_1996.JPGDuring last week’s CNN debates, nearly 600 media descended upon Saint Anselm College, including a global contingent of reporters from Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Japan, Sweden, and the United Kingdom, among others.

Prof. Dean Spiliotes, director of research at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics and Matt St. John ‘09 were both quoted in a BBC News story over the weekend. A photograph of St. John was included with the story. You can read an excerpt below and view the full story at http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/6728595.stm.

Want to meet the next president of the United States? Move to New Hampshire and you stand a good chance.

In a country of some 300 million people, the state’s 1.3 million residents are perhaps the most heavily-canvassed and targeted voters of any in the nation, bar Iowa.

Last week each party’s candidates flocked to New Hampshire for the latest televised debates, as they seek the all-important nomination to run for president in 2008.

It’s not for lack of attention on the part of the candidates, however.

Rather, such is the buzz surrounding some of the frontrunners that instead of meeting them at a cosy coffee morning, people have found themselves in a crowd of hundreds or even thousands.

Senators Clinton and Obama have attracted large crowds to events

Dean Spiliotes, director of research at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College, says this has been particularly true of some events held by Democrats Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama.

“Early on some of Obama’s advisors suggested in the media they would do something a bit differently from the traditional New Hampshire model,” he says.

“They are still doing some of these larger events - but also the smaller ones. But it’s difficult. Part of it is that they are popular candidates.”

He warns it is important not to underestimate the power of retail, or face-to-face, politicking - especially in a state where the residents are very switched-on.

“Voters meet the candidates directly and in general, what we have found is that voters seek out candidates that they already have an affinity for,” he says.

“Then they get more excited and so bring in their friends and their families and it has a multiplying effect. It helps the candidates mobilize networks of supporters.”

Both the Clinton and Obama campaign teams have said they intend to organize more small-scale events.

That should come as a relief to 19-year-old Matt St. John, who moved to New Hampshire to study precisely because he wanted to meet the political movers and shakers.

“I realized it was a different world,” he says. “I’ve seen every presidential candidate at least once or twice, I’ve seen Hillary Clinton, Karl Rove, President and Laura Bush.”

“There are 18 candidates. If I go to 18 events and ask the same questions of them all, I will be able to ask the next president of the United States something that is important to me.”

“It’s an amazing opportunity to have as a 19-year-old.”

For the full story, visit http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/6728595.stm.

The Republicans Are Here

June 5, 2007

IMG_1914.JPGT-10 minutes until the Republican Debate begins. I’ve been roaming the campus since 3 p.m. this afternoon taking photos and trying to capture all the excitement on campus. I started my afternoon taking photos of supporters and protesters at the entrance to the college on Saint Anselm Drive and then traveled down to Sullivan Arena for a look behind the scenes.

You can view the the photos on Flickr at www.flickr.com/photos/saintanselm/tags/republican. A Flash slide show is available at www.flickr.com/photos/saintanselm/tags/republican/show. Be sure to check back later this evening and tomorrow morning for additional photos submitted by the team of photographers covering the debate.

I’ll watch the debate in the media filing center and then travel over to the “spin room” in Stoughtenburg Gymnasium at the conclusion of the debates.

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