NHIOP Research Center Dedicated to Thomas Dodd

April 25, 2008

Sen. Chris DoddFather Jonathan DeFelice, O.S.B., president of the college, dedicated a research center at the NHIOP in honor of the late Sen. Thomas J. Dodd, a 1926 graduate of Saint Anselm College’s preparatory school and 1964 honorary degree recipient. Dodd was a senior prosecutor in the international war crimes trials of Nazi leaders after WWII and dedicated his life to public service, the rule of law, and the protection of human rights. Read more

Andrea Berlin ‘08: The Hawks’ Foundation

January 23, 2008

Andrea Berlin '08 Andrea Berlin maintains she is still pleasantly puzzled by the sequence of events that resulted in her arrival on the Hilltop nearly four years ago. Read more

A Semester in Paris

December 12, 2007

Lauren Weybrew ‘08, a frequent blogger and podcaster on this site, studied abroad in Paris, France during her spring 2007 semester. During her five months in Paris, she blogged about her experiences for our admitted student online community. She recently produced an audio slideshow about her Paris experience and has made all of her photos and blog posts available through the college Web site at www.anselm.edu/parisblog.

[youtube width="361" height="302"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CT0PFCy3OhA[/youtube]

Saint Anselm to Host ABC Debates Jan. 5

November 29, 2007

Alumni Hall WinterSaint Anselm College will host the final presidential primary debates before the New Hampshire primary, Father Jonathan DeFelice, O.S.B., college president, has announced.On Saturday, January 5, ABC News, WMUR-TV, and the social networking site, Facebook, will stage back-to-back Democratic and Republican debates at the Dana Center. The nationally televised program will start at 7 p.m., with each debate running for 90 minutes. The Republicans will debate first, followed by the Democrats. Read more

NHIOP Poll: Romney, Clinton Leading Among Likely Voters

November 2, 2007

Cross-posted on New Hampshire Institute of Politics Web Site

If the New Hampshire Primary were held today, Mitt Romney and Hillary Clinton would win solidly. That is the finding of a poll being presented today by the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College.

Sponsored by the institute, the poll surveyed 1,514 likely primary voters in New Hampshire.With 43 percent support, Hillary Clinton commanded a 21-point lead over her nearest rival, Barack Obama, who polled at 22 percent. The third-place candidate was John Edwards, with 14 percent.

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Clinton polled strongly across genders, religions and age groups. She made a greater showing among 18-to-29-year-olds than Obama, who has been portrayed as the candidate of young people.The poll shows Romney with a nearly 11-point lead over the second place candidate, Rudy Giuliani, among likely Republican primary voters. Fred Thomson showed only 5 percent support.

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Romney also polled well across religious groups, indicating that in New Hampshire the former Massachusetts governor’s Mormon religion is not an issue. Romney showed strong support among women, with 37 percent saying they would vote for him, compared to 29 percent of men.While Romney and Clinton pulled a majority among likely primary voters of their respective parties, the picture is mixed among undeclared voters. More than 40 percent of voters who identified themselves as undeclared said they were still unsure if they would vote in the Democratic or Republican primary. At the same time, 41 percent of undeclared voters said they would vote in Democratic primary and 19 percent in the Republican contest.

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“While the patterns remain consistent, the data suggests there is still indecisiveness among likely voters in New Hampshire,” said Michael Dupre, Ph.D., senior fellow at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics.

Dupre designed and coordinated the poll, which was executed by SRBI Research in New York City. The survey was conducted by telephone from Oct. 15 to 21. The margin of error for the entire sample is approximately 2.6 percent. The margin of error for subgroups is 4.1 percent for Democrats, 4.5 percent for Republicans, and 4.8 percent for undecided voters.

For a poll executive summary, data, presentation, and methodology, visit the New Hampshire Institute of Politics Web site.

Original release authored by Barbara LeBlanc, director of news and information, Saint Anselm College

Prof. Elizabeth Ossoff Quoted by Australian Media

October 18, 2007

Prof. Elizabeth Ossoff Quoted by Australian MediaSaint Anselm College Professor Elizabeth Ossoff was quoted by the Australia Broadcasting Corp. (ABC News) in an article that appeared on their Web site on October 17. In the article, she says she is not surprised Sen. Hillary Clinton is now directly appealing to female voters.

An excerpt of the article appears below. To read the article in its entirety, visit the ABC News Web site.

“I think she’s done everything she can to appeal to male voters in terms of packaging herself as very strong and decisive,” Dr. Ossoff said.

“I think she’s smart to work off of the fact that she has a large support base amongst women, why not play off of that?

“Because I think she knows where she is going to get a lot of traction, come the general election as well as in the primary.”

Dr. Ossoff says the fact that Sen. Clinton is the first woman candidate with a realistic shot of becoming president could have a strong impact on the presidential race.

“We’ve been talking about the role of the first prominent female candidate here in this presidential election, [but] I don’t hear that much talk about it amongst the American press,” she said.

“Every once in a while it will get mentioned when she does things like she’s doing today, which is moving around the state of New Hampshire and talking about women and women’s issues, but only then.

“I think its sort of the elephant in the room that no one wants to talk about.

“The gender does play a role in the way that we perceive people and we like to think we’re beyond that, but we really aren’t, and we haven’t really been paying attention to that very much.”

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