Unimaginable Becomes Reality

March 6, 2008

Spring Break Alternative participants woke up this morning with a roof over their head, a mattress under their body heat to warm them, and a full breakfast waiting to be consumed. For many on Pine Ridge Reservation, this was not the case.

Morning activities were curtailed due to weather conditions, as the snowstorm of yesterday left roads too dangerous for travel this morning. Overnight, a biting wind whipped snow horizontally across the open land, as the temperature plummeted into the teens.

Saint Anselm Students Work on Bunkbeds at Re-MemberBunk bed assembly continued through the morning, along with a special project: the building of a new door for the outhouse that had been relocated the day before at a residence in the community of Porcupine. Several students took it upon themselves after the day’s work to take meticulous measurements of the opening - and approached the Re-Member staff at the conclusion of the day to inquire on the possibility of building the door, and returning to the site to install it.

Under a crisp blue sky, and a blanket of fresh white snow, the team of Saint Anselm students constructed the door carefully. The workshop was abuzz with the whirr of power sanders and circular saws as others continued the task of assembling the components for beds.
Following lunch, the groups split up to best utilize the afternoon. One van returned to Porcupine to install the door, and finish work inside the house. Others remained at Re-Member, helping staff with an inventory of building supplies and other odd-jobs around the workshop.

Saint Anselm Students Work on Bunkbeds at Re-MemberYour blogger followed the crew back to the Porcupine house, and watched as they carefully installed the door. Outside for two-plus hours in the cold, the door was carefully hung, and subsequently covered in a coat of fresh white paint.In the center of the door was inscribed a Lakota saying: Mitakuye Oyasin. Translated in English, this phrase means “we are all related.”

Darkness settled over the hills, and as the group settled into their evening with board games and the opportunity to work on native crafts, a man we came to know as Kevin rolled himself into Re-Member in his wheelchair. Kevin came to Re-Member to offer his artwork and crafts for sale. As he laid charcoal paintings out onto the tables, he informed the group that he was selling his works for as close to forty dollars as anyone could offer. A few students sat down to talk with him, and learned that he was down and out. His situation was bleak, and it was learned that he had hitchhiked some ten miles in his wheelchair on snow-covered roads to offer his work for sale. Several participants purchased his works, everyone marveled at them.

As Kevin prepared to leave, he was offered a van ride back to his home in the community of North Ridge. Accepting the offer, he asked on the ride home to stop at the only grocery store on the reservation - Lakota Nation in the village proper of Pine Ridge.

Kevin used the money he had received from the students for his artwork to buy dinner for his family. Driving into his community, stray dogs ran loose in the streets. Houses were sprayed with graffiti, many houses appeared dark from the outside. Many residences were boarded up, abandoned and partially collapsed or in extreme disrepair. With grocery bags in hand, the front door of Kevin’s house was opened. Inside light bulbs flickered with an unsteady flow of electricity. A small heater sat in the middle of the room, responsible for heating the whole first floor of the house. Clothing, dirty dishes and trash littered the countertops, furniture and floors. Seven children were inside the house with their mother.

As the grocery bags were carried in, the kids tore at the plastic to get into the food. With grace, Kevin introduced his family, his wife, and his newborn child. He came ten-plus miles in the snow and cold with no promise that anyone was going to buy anything. He engaged the group in conversation for upwards of an hour, and was prepared to hitchhike back to Pine Ridge to buy what he could carry to feed his family.

Last night, Kevin and his family had food in their home because a group of students from Saint Anselm College came to South Dakota for their spring break, and bought his artwork. The unimaginable was verified yesterday. In Kevin’s home, and in a grocery store that offers meat scraps for sale, and that seemed to have no fruit it it’s aisles - hold a few bundles of bananas - the stark reality of Pine Ridge Reservation became grossly apparent.

Additional photos are available on our Flickr photo sharing site.


Comments

One Response to “Unimaginable Becomes Reality”

  1. Lauren on March 6th, 2008 7:46 pm

    Hi all Spring Breakers! It is great reading about your experiences- I went to HOME in Maine in ‘95 and lead a trip to Pennsylvania in ‘96. It is great knowing that you are all conitinuing great work! Be proud of the work you are doing- it will truly change your views of the world.
    Lauren Ashe (Barnard) ‘97

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