Blogging Overview/Tutorial

December 31, 2006

The college uses a free, open source blogging software called WordPress (www.wordpress.org). Included below is information on how to log in and post content to the blog.

Log In / Administrative Interface
Address: http://blogs.saintanselmcollege.net/wp-login.php
Username: E-mailed to you
Password: E-mailed to you

Please note: There is a login link in the footer of every blog page. If you navigate away from the administration page, type the address above to get back into the blog’s backend admin interface.

Video Tutorials are available here - http://blogsforlearning.msu.edu/tutorials

After you log in to the site you will be directed to the blog’s Dashboard (see image below).

Blog Dashboard

Blog Posting

  1. To write a new blog post, click the “Write” link (located between Dashboad and Manage).
  2. An editor will open. Enter a title for your post, your blog text (what you are writing about), choose a short URL for your post in the “Post Slug,” e.g., first-post, and lastly, check off a category for your post (in this case, I want this post to appear under Election 2008 and New Hampshire Primary).
  3. When you are finished adding your post, click Save if you aren’t finished or Publish if you want it to be published live to the blog. That’s it. There’s more to learn, but this will get you started.

Writing a Blog Post

“The Way to Win,” Mark Halperin Talks Politics at the NHIOP

December 6, 2006

Mark HalperinOn December 5, 2006, the New Hampshire Institute of Politics hosted a lecture by Mark Halperin, political director of ABC News. As political director, Halperin is responsible for the planning and editorial content of all political news on the network. He works with correspondants and producers for all ABC News programs, including World News With Charles Gibson, This Week With George Stephanopoulos, Nightline, 20/20, and news specials.

Halperin’s recent book, The Way to Win: Taking the White House in 2008, examines the personal lives and political histories of some of the biggest names in recent presidential politics.

Podcast Opening Music by Van Davis, “One Question at a Time.” Available on the Podsafe Music Network.

 
 nhiop12 [62:10m]: Play Now | Play in Popup | Download

What Would Plato Do?

December 4, 2006

Saint Anselm professors Elaine Rizzo and Edward McGushin were featured this morning on New Hampshire Public Radio’s call-in program, The Exchange. You can listen to the show through the NHPR Web site at www.nhpr.org/node/11916. Provided below is NHPR’s show description.

“Professors from Saint Anselm College are bringing the ancient Greek philosopher’s lessons to the Goffstown Women’s Prison. The goal: using philosophy to explain how we make choices. We’ll explore how Plato’s work can still apply to all areas of our lives, from politics to love. Laura Knoy’s guests are Edward McGushin, assistant professor of philosophy at Saint Anselm College, and Elaine Rizzo, professor of criminal justice and co-director of the Consortium of Justice and Society at Saint Anselm College.”

Getting to Know Dr. Denise Askin

December 1, 2006

Saint Anselm English Professor Denise Askin was recently featured in Diverse: Issues in Higher Education magazine. An excerpt of the article is included below. To read the article in its entirety, visit www.diverseeducation.com/artman/publish/article_6609.shtml

“American Indian literature classes are not plentiful at U.S. colleges and universities, to say the least. But Dr. Denise T. Askin, an English professor at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H., is devoted to the subject and is trying to keep it alive in her fall semester class, Native American Voices. Although she isn’t American Indian, Askin has been teaching the class for three years.

“Many of the Native American writers we study stress the importance of story to the survival of the people,” she says. “The story and storyteller keep all that is sacred and meaningful alive for the people. I ask the students to think about the role of story in their own lives and culture, and to think about what is lost when the storytellers are silenced. It is a powerful lesson in the endurance of the human spirit.”